What Is the Agreement between the Milestone Decision Authority and Program Manager That Will Be Used

At the time of the stage, the MDA will finalize, if it is not already completed: The Stage B decision approves the entry of the program into the EMD phase and the awarding of contracts for EMD activities. As a result of precedents for an agile approach to streamlining documentation set out in previous milestone decisions, there are expected to be few additional requirements for this review of decisions. Agile-minded program managers should continually socialize program changes with key stakeholders during the transition period between decision points. More frequent ongoing reviews and ongoing coordination with stakeholders create the conditions for effective decision-making reviews. The MDA should focus on assessing the known risks and mitigation measures needed to carry out the iterative design, development, integration, testing, and deployment activities that are unique to Agile EMD activities. Because incremental deployment of features begins at this point, the risk mitigation solution is also tiered incrementally. That is, while all known risks need to be adequately mitigated for the next iteration, the allocation of resources to mitigate the risks associated with subsequent iterations of capacity may be less prioritized or deferred until the results of previous development activities are available. These include technology, engineering, integration, manufacturing, sustainability and cost risks. Similarly, capacity requirements continue to be refined, with short-term iterations being best resolved. Milestone B is another opportunity to reinforce key principles with MDA and stakeholder organizations by adapting the program structure and acquisition processes to enable agile practices as outlined in the acquisition strategy. This includes structuring, monitoring and approving releases with subordinate officials empowered to make timely decisions while providing leadership with regular insight into program progress and issues. Given the dynamic nature of Agile, a must be structured at a high enough level not to limit the change in scope and to support iterative design and release development. Risks must be mitigated to an acceptable level in order to continue within EMD using development releases to mitigate risk, ideally with multiple potential vendors.

The tmRR phase should have given the government ample opportunity to intelligently design agile practices by understanding the unique environments for managing requirements, changes, measures, roles and responsibilities between government and contractor, customized processes, version execution, and competing priorities and incentives. While Stage B is a formal commitment of resources, the commitment is limited to any or all rejection groups if the contractor or program office does not make or demonstrate adequate progress. One of the main benefits of agile development is to regularly demonstrate the ability to work to users and other stakeholders. This provides the best insight into preliminary progress and shifts the focus from a document-based exam to a focus on maturity and skill delivery. A separate APB is required for each increment of an MDAP or MAIS program and each subroutine of an MDAP. Increments can be used to plan simultaneous or sequential efforts to deliver capacity faster and based on the technology readiness of each increment. (If an MDAP requires the provision of two or more categories of end products that differ significantly in form and function, subroutines may be established.) The program proponent and PM will ensure that the content includes KPP/KSA Sustainment parameters, measurement measures, and any programmatic directions that affect the planning and execution of the lifecycle support strategy. Like the custom list for Stage A, the PMO, in collaboration with the MDA, should significantly adapt the documents required to comply with legal and regulatory requirements. A proposed custom list of the information required for Milestone B will be provided in a future AiDA update. See DoDI 5000.02, Table 2 for a complete list of required information. Stage B is usually the official launch of an acquisition program with the approval of the Acquisition Program Base (PDB) by the MDA. The PDB is the agreement between the DPA and the Program Manager and his or her chain of command that is used for monitoring and reporting throughout the life of the program or program increment.

The PDB will include affordability caps for production and maintenance costs. Affordability limits are defined as fixed cost requirements that correspond to CPPs. APD`s cost, schedule and performance reference levels should be at a high overall program level to allow for the flexibility to move requirements within and between versions. Milestone B is another opportunity to reinforce key principles with MDA and stakeholder organizations by adapting the structure of procurement programs and processes to enable agile practices as outlined in the acquisition strategy. This includes the structure, monitoring and approval of publications with lower-level officials empowered to make timely decisions while providing management with a regular overview of program progress and issues. Given the dynamics of Agile, a sufficiently high level should be structured in such a way as not to limit scope changes and to support iterative design and version development. Risks should be reduced to an acceptable level for negotiating in MDAs with development releases to reduce risk, ideally with multiple potential vendors. The tmRR phase should have enabled the government to engage in agile practices by understanding the unique environments for managing requirements, changes, actions, roles and responsibilities of governments and contractors, customized processes, implementation of versions, and competing priorities and incentives. If point B is a formal commitment, the commitment shall be limited to one or more versions if the contractor or the programme office cannot make or demonstrate adequate progress. One of the main benefits of agile development is to regularly demonstrate the ability to work with users and other stakeholders.

This gives the best overview of the intermediate level and shifts the focus from a document-based exam to a focus on maturity and availability of skills. Once an acquisition program is formally launched, the program office develops an acquisition strategy that outlines the planning, consultation and management approach to be used during the multi-year development and procurement process. The Acquisition Program Baseline (PDB) is developed by the Program Manager (PM) before launching a program for all Acquisition Category Programs (ACATs) and maps the current status of a program. The plan specifies thresholds and targets for cost, schedule and performance requirements for a program. Performance requirements are listed in the form of Key Performance Metrics (KPPs) and Key System Attributes (GBA) and are linked to program objectives. These KPPs and KSAs are developed by the programme promoters (users) and can be found in the Capacity Design Document (CDD) or Capacity Production Document (CPD) and are also documented in the technical reference database. The Milestone Decision Authority (MDA) is the approval authority of the PDB. The PDB allows the Program Manager (PM) to track program objectives against a formal baseline. This follow-up notifies the PM of any potential problems that may arise and takes corrective action to keep a program within its objectives. An APB is required for each increment and block of a Major Defense Acquisition Program (MDAP) or Major Acquisition Information System (MAIS). Deviations from an approved PDB must be documented in a Program Variance Report (RDP). Other important documents that must support and approve the program are the Business Requirements Document and the Core Acquisition Program.

At the end of the demonstration and validation phase, the acquisition program reaches the Phase II decision point for the development permit. The decision-making authority must accurately assess the affordability of the program at this stage and define a development baseline (a refinement or revision of the initial baseline of the acquisition program approved in Phase I). The low initial production volume to be achieved before the end of the first audit is also determined by the decision-making authority of the second milestone in consultation with the Director, the operational test and the evaluation. The quantities of items required for the tax audit are also determined here by the testing community and in particular by the Director of Operational Testing and Evaluation for ACAT I. (A major challenge for the DoD is to balance the desire to test on the production versions of the system with the need to complete operational testing before full production needs to be completed. This is particularly difficult when it comes to significant costs associated with continuing low production or temporary decommissioning to perform certain tests and evaluations, or to resolve some of the problems that occurred during initial operational testing.) A separate PDB is required for each increment of an MDAP or GOAL program and each subroutine of an MDAP. Increments can be used to plan simultaneous or sequential efforts to provide faster capacity and based on the technology readiness of each increment. .